“What’s In Your Panties?” Examining Vaginal Freshness, Baby Powder and Ovarian Cancer Risk

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Try watching television for any length of time without seeing a commercial for scented or odor masking feminine hygiene products. Viewers young and old are exposed to advertising that references “fresh” and “not so fresh” feelings, urging women to be proactive; to sanitize, clean and essentially fumigate their vaginas–or else.

From douches and powders to suppositories and deodorant sprays, women use a variety of chemical-based products that upset the vagina’s PH balance, creating a breeding-ground for the very odoriferous bacteria no one wants growing down below. Certainly this news has made its rounds. Although many women cling to douches and feminine washes for lack of a better alternative, the most knowledgeable and health-savvy women seek natural alternatives to maintain a comfortable level of cleanliness, health and comfort without using the chemicals that defeat the purpose.

 

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“It can’t hurt to sprinkle a little baby powder…” Baby powder in your panties can lead to ovarian cancer. The American Cancer Society provides statistical data about the chances of developing cancer if baby powder travels into the vagina and enters the cervix, uterus, and/or fallopian tubes. And according to Harvard Medical School’s Dr. Daniel Cramer, talc has been causing ovarian cancer for years! Pharmaceutical commercials can be comical with their mile-long lists of possible side-effects, which often include worse symptoms than the initial illness–and can sometimes be fatal! But there’s nothing funny about baby powder. People use it on babies. How many parents ignorantly and innocently dust their little ones’ bottoms with good old Johnson’s baby powder?

Taking responsibility for personal hygiene and freshness is great. But the only responsible way to maintain an organ as intricate as a vagina is to investigate the best possible natural methods you can use to keep yourself fresh without dying an early death because of perineal perfumes. It’s true that the vagina is “self-cleansing” as naturalists assert. However, proper research can lead you to an appropriate routine to guarantee that you feel, smell and even taste 100% fresh at all times.

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Rather than following the prompts of a television commercial or a magazine ad, conduct your own vaginal anatomy and pysiology RESEARCH to discover the best products to use. Never use powders and creams to mask an odor. An odor indicates a problem, and a problem shouldn’t be masked; it should be solved. Contrary to advertisements, it’s possible to avoid yeast infections, vaginosis and foul odors altogether. In your research, don’t stop at perfume products. Investigate the tampons, pads, condoms or lubricants that enter or make contact with your vaginal area.

Diet, exercise, water intake and overall health play important roles in vaginal cleanliness, as do sexual activities, soaps, fabrics, and hygiene habits. If a universal solution exists for vaginal freshness, it’s probably found in nature and not advertised on television. Find out what works for others and then develop a routine that works for you. And never put powder in your panties.

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